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20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)
and this is the most significant move in dsca that i have seen in my career. since late november, 2011, comprehensive planning meetings have taken place to analyze the issues surrounding dsca and have provided a laundry list for recommendations of actions to be taken. the department of defense in the person of the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, the key principle staff members of the department, and our primary combatant commanders and commanders responsible for civil authority support are now acting on those recommendations in the form of directed tasks. the tasks sound very familiar for those who have participated here in san francisco fleet week over the last several years. the focus is on integrated planning with civil authorities, swift operations and mobilization, utilization of installations, capabilities and personnel, enhanced organizational effectiveness and improved doctrine, education, training and exercises. the directive comes with an already increased attention on dsca which we have seen the development of courses and training now delivered at multiple professional military ed
on it, too. i look at what we accomplished in 2010, we had a meeting to understand dsca, in 2011 we had the table top exercise, we debriefed that, we had a great speaker then we had an education seminar. this time, this year we had a functional exercise in august which was terrific, you saw the panel, a medical exercise as part of fleet week and you saw the enthusiasm of the participants, then we had the back brief. now we've had a strategic operational and tactical discussions about going forward and the things that we can accomplish. so what are you going to do in 2013? well, fill out the form and tell us what you think we ought to do but we're going to be working hard to move this forward. i think ray cheney said it from cal fire best today: we are all better off because we're in here for the last day and a half and i'm sitting here wondering, all my contemporaries, what have they been doing for the last 36 hours? they haven't been doing anything near as important as what we've been doing. i thank all of you so much for participating and stay in touch. if we've got your email a
training, understanding ics, understanding dsca and that's defense support of civil authorities. it's the guiding principles for how our armed services are going to support civilians when something happens. and i think those are common across a lot of the themes you are going to hear today and throughout the weekend. so i'd kind of like to take those two off the table because they are sort of gimmes and put it to you, what are the things you told your boss about this exercise and what is something that for next year you would like to see us do? michelle, if you'd start us off. >> so i think that the major task for next year when we do this communications drill, which i hope we continue to do, and i think you mentioned this earlier, we assumed that all of the city's primary communications were online and operational. we used 800 megahertz push to talk radios here. we assumed that system was online and operational and i think next year it would be a really good exercise for us to pull that communications capability out of the picture and use military assets. i think we're going t
actually had an hour lecture on dsca, which is pretty incredible to get everything about dsca in one hour. it was a great effort by the folks who do that lecture. to show you how well i listened, i have some take away points on that. the first is that all disasters are local. the folks here in san francisco are going to be in charge from the minute the disaster happens and i think that that's really critical to understand. the local authorities evaluate the situation on the ground and execute what locally is available, then they evaluate shortfalls and what they have and then generate those requirements up through that defined chain of command, as i mentioned earlier. then once those agencies determine what those requirements are, they are given back to the city who employs those as they think they need to be deployed because, again, they are the eyes and understand the local situation. i think going through this that the navy and the marine corps, we're used to being in charge whenever we show up and we're not going to be in this situation. i think it's important for us to understand
communication system, through dsca and the various military interagencies. we will do that, partly because it's interesting, partly because it's challenges, but because as someone said all disasters are local. somewhere there's a little girl or little by or grandmother that is counting on us to get it right. so i thank you in advance for that young boy, that young girl, that family, whose lives will be changed, whose lives may even be preserved, because of your efforts. thank you for inviting me here today, thank you for allowing me to learn from you, thank you for allowing me it share a little bit about what we do and mostly to simply say thank you, it was my pleasure to be here, secretary schultz, thank you, admiral beeman, thank u. ladies and gentlemen, that's all i have. if you have any questions i'll be happy to take them. response and recovery. and the moderator for this panel is the city administrator for the city and county of san francisco, naomi kelly. please help me welcome naomi kelly. (applause). >> good afternoon, everyone. thank you for having me here today. again, i'm nao
the box of dsca and ir and what the culmination is with a fire drop where we're dropping watter. we conduct aircrew briefings simply because cal fire recognizes that you great folks have a primary mission, that's defense of the nation and we respect that and we understand this is an ancillary job and there is a high revel of rotation of people coming back from afghanistan or iraq, whatever the case may be, but we also reach out to squadron level training. it really comes down to meeting with your cooperating agencies and training together on a frequent basis and having good and open dialogue. >> as i look back at that map here, knowing we were heading into that time of year where we're going to hit significant fire weather and knowing northern california as we are now but eventually southern california, one of the most effective ways to stop the fires from growing is that initial attack, which means we need to be able to quickly put resources up in the air and move them. i guess my question is from a national guard perspective, from a naval perspective, with the helicopter resource
Search Results 0 to 47 of about 48 (some duplicates have been removed)